TROOP•444

Old Hickory Council - Hanging Rock District

Troop 444: Textile Merit Badge

 

Textile

 

 

Requirements

  1. Discuss with your merit badge counselor the importance of textiles. In your discussion define the terms fiber, fabric and textile. Give examples of textiles you use every day.
  2. Do the following:
        A. Get swatches of two natural fiber fabrics (100 percent cotton, linen, wool or silk; no blends) Get
              swatches of two synthetic fiber fabrics (nylon, polyester, acrylic, olefin, or spandex). Get a sample
              of one cellulosic fabric (rayon, acetate or lyocell).
        B. Give the origin, major characteristics, and general content of each type of fiber obtained for 2(a).
              Explain the difference between a cellulosic manufactured fiber and a synthetic manufactured fiber.
        C. Describe the main steps in making raw fiber into yarn, and yarn into fabric.
        D. Assume you will soon buy a new garment or other textile item. Tell your counselor what fiber or
              blend of fibers you want the item to be, and give reasons for your choice.
  3. Do TWO of the following:
        A. Visit a textile plant, textile products manufacturer or textile school or college. Report on what you
              saw and learned.
        B. Weave a belt, headband, place mat or wall hanging. Use a simple loom that you have made yourself.
        C. With a magnifying glass, examine a woven fabric, a nonwoven fabric, and a knitted fabric. Sketch
              what you see. Explain how the three constructions are different.
        D. Make a piece of felt.
        E. Make two natural dyes and use them to dye a garment or a piece of fabric.
        F. Waterproof a fabric.
        G. Demonstrate how to identify fibers, using a microscope for identification or the breaking test.
  4. Explain the meaning of 10 of the following terms: warp, harness, heddle, shed, aramid, spandex, sliver, yarn, spindle, distaff, loom, cellulose, sericulture, extrusion, carbon fibers, spinneret, staple, worsted, nonwoven, greige goods.
  5. List the advantages and disadvantages of natural plant fibers, natural animal fibers, cellulosic manufactured fibers, and synthetic manufactured fibers. Identify and discuss at least four ecological concerns regarding the production and care of textiles.
  6. Explain to your merit badge counselor, either verbally or in a written report, five career possibilities in the textile industry. Tell about two positions that interest you the most and the education, cost of training and specific duties those positions require.

Textile Worksheets for use in working on these requirements

Boy Scout Oath

On my honor, I will do my best

To do my duty to God and my Country and to obey the Scout Law;

To help other people at all times;

To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

Boy Scout Law

A Scout Is...

A Scout tells the truth.
He keeps his promises.
Honesty is part of his code of conduct.
People can depend on him.
TRUSTWORTHY
A Scout is true to his family, Scout leaders, friends, school, and nation.LOYAL
A Scout is concerned about other people. He does things willingly for others without pay or reward.HELPFUL
A Scout is a friend to all.
He is a brother to other Scouts.
He seeks to understand others.
He respects those with ideas and customs other than his own.
FRIENDLY
A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position.
He knows good manners make it easier for people to get along together.
COURTEOUS
A Scout understands there is strength in being gentle.
He treats others as he wants to be treated.
He does not hurt or kill harmless things without reason.
KIND
A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop.
He obeys the laws of his community and country.
If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobey them.
OBEDIENT
A Scout looks for the bright side of things.
He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy.
CHEERFUL
A Scout works to pay his way and to help others.
He saves for unforeseen needs.
He protects and conserves natural resources.
He carefully uses time and property.
THRIFTY
A Scout can face danger even if he is afraid.
He has the courage to stand for what he thinks is right even if others laugh at or threaten him.
BRAVE
A Scout keeps his body and mind fit and clean.
He goes around with those who believe in living by these same ideals.
He helps keep his home and community clean.
CLEAN
A Scout is reverent toward God.
He is faithful in his religious duties.
He respects the beliefs of others.
REVERENT