TROOP•444

Old Hickory Council - Hanging Rock District

Troop 444: Metalwork Merit Badge

 

Metalwork

 

 

Requirements

  1. Read the safety rules for metalwork Discuss how to be safe while working with metal. Discuss with your counselor the additional safety rules that apply to the metalwork option you choose for requirement 5.
  2. Define the terms native metal, malleable, metallurgy, alloy, nonferrous, and ferrous. Then do the following:
        A. Name two nonferrous alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers. Name the metals that are
              combined to form these alloys.
        B. Name three ferrous alloys used by modern metalworkers.
        C. Describe how to work–harden a metal.
        D. Describe how to anneal a non-ferrous and a ferrous metal.
  3. Do the following:
        A. Work-harden a piece of 26- or 28-gauge sheet brass or sheet copper. Put a 45-degree bend in the
              metal, then heavily peen the area along the bend line to work-harden it. Note the amount of effort
              that is required to overcome the yield point in this un-worked piece of metal.
        B. Soften the work hardened piece from requirement 3a by annealing it and then try to remove the
              45–degree bend. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.
        C. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. Using hand tools, make and temper a center
              punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel.
  4. Find out about three career opportunities in metalworking. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.
  5. After completing the first four requirements, complete at least ONE of the options listed below.
        A. Option 1 – Sheet Metal Mechanic / Tinsmith
            1. Name and describe the use of the basic sheet metalworking tools.
            2. Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet metal. Include each component's dimensions
                  on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
            3. Make two objects out of 24- or 26–gauge sheet metal. Use patterns either provided by your
                  counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Construct these objects using a
                  metal that is appropriate to the object's ultimate purpose, and using cutting, bending, edging,
                  and either soldering or brazing.
                A. One object also must include at least one riveted component
                B. If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel or tin-plated sheet steel, preserve
                      your work from oxidation.
        B. Option 2 - Silversmith
            1. Name and describe the use of a silversmith's basic tools.
            2. Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet silver. Include each component's dimensions
                  on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
            3. Make two objects out of 8- or 20- gauge sheet copper. Use patterns either provided by your
                  counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Both objects must include a
                  soldered joint. If you have prior silversmithing experience, you may substitute sterling silver,
                  nickel silver, or lead free pewter.
                A. At least one object must include a sawed component you have made yourself.
                B. At least one object must include a sunken part you have made yourself.
                C. Clean and polish your objects.
        C. Option 3 – Founder
            1. Name and describe the use of the basic parts of a two–piece mold. Name at least three different
                  types of molds.
            2. Create a sketch of two objects to cast in metal. Include each component's dimensions on your
                  sketch, which need not be to scale.
            3. Make two molds, one using a pattern provided by your counselor and another you have made
                  yourself that has been approved by your counselor. Position the pouring gate and vents yourself.
                  Do not use copyrighted materials as patterns.
                A. Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using a mold provided by your counselor.
                B. Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using the mold that you have made.
        D. Option 4 - Blacksmith
            1. Name and describe the use of a blacksmith's basic tools.
            2. Make a sketch of two objects to hot-forge. Include each component’s dimensions on your sketch,
                  which need not be to scale.
            3. Using low–carbon steel at least ¼ inch thick, perform the following exercises:
                A. Draw out by forging a taper.
                B. Use the horn of the anvil by forging a U-shaped bend.
                C. Form a decorative twist in a piece of square steel.
                D. Use the edge of the anvil to bend metal by forging an L–shaped bend.
            4. Using low-carbon steel at least ¼ inch thick, make the two objects you sketched that require hot
                  -forging. Be sure you have your counselor's approval before you begin.
                A. Include a decorative twist on one object.
                B. Include a hammer-riveted joint in one object.
                C. Preserve your work from oxidation.

Metalwork Worksheets for use in working on these requirements

Boy Scout Oath

On my honor, I will do my best

To do my duty to God and my Country and to obey the Scout Law;

To help other people at all times;

To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

Boy Scout Law

A Scout Is...

A Scout tells the truth.
He keeps his promises.
Honesty is part of his code of conduct.
People can depend on him.
TRUSTWORTHY
A Scout is true to his family, Scout leaders, friends, school, and nation.LOYAL
A Scout is concerned about other people. He does things willingly for others without pay or reward.HELPFUL
A Scout is a friend to all.
He is a brother to other Scouts.
He seeks to understand others.
He respects those with ideas and customs other than his own.
FRIENDLY
A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position.
He knows good manners make it easier for people to get along together.
COURTEOUS
A Scout understands there is strength in being gentle.
He treats others as he wants to be treated.
He does not hurt or kill harmless things without reason.
KIND
A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop.
He obeys the laws of his community and country.
If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobey them.
OBEDIENT
A Scout looks for the bright side of things.
He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy.
CHEERFUL
A Scout works to pay his way and to help others.
He saves for unforeseen needs.
He protects and conserves natural resources.
He carefully uses time and property.
THRIFTY
A Scout can face danger even if he is afraid.
He has the courage to stand for what he thinks is right even if others laugh at or threaten him.
BRAVE
A Scout keeps his body and mind fit and clean.
He goes around with those who believe in living by these same ideals.
He helps keep his home and community clean.
CLEAN
A Scout is reverent toward God.
He is faithful in his religious duties.
He respects the beliefs of others.
REVERENT